Journal Contents

Am Jour Ophthalmol
Br J Ophthalmol
Can J Ophthalmol
J Cat Ref Surg
Cornea
Curr Eye Res
Eur J Ophthalmol
Eye
J Glaucoma
JAMA Ophthalmol
Graefes Ophthalmol
Indian J Ophthalmol
Int Ophthalmol Clin
Invest Ophth Vis Sci
Jpn J Ophthalmol
JPOS
Korean J Ophthal
J Neuroophthalmol
Ophthalmic Epidemiol
Ophthalmic Genet
Ophthal Plast Rec Surg
Ophthalmic Res
Ophthalmologica
Ophthalmology
Retina
Surv Ophthalmol
Ophthalmology Review Journal
Eye[JOUR] Established 1995
1. Eye (Lond). 2014 Sep 12. doi: 10.1038/eye.2014.197. [Epub ahead of print]

Influence of choroidal thickness on subfoveal choroidal thickness measurement
repeatability using enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography.

Cho AR(1), Choi YJ(1), Kim YT(2); Medscape.

Author information: 
(1)Department of Ophthalmology, Ewha Womans University Medical Center, School of
Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
(2)1] Department of Ophthalmology, Ewha Womans University Medical Center, School of 
Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea [2] GT5 Research Program, Ewha Womans
University Medical Center, School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

PurposeTo determine the influence of choroidal thickness (CT) and image setting
on repeatability of subfoveal choroidal thickness (SFCT) manual measurement using
enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT).MethodsThis
retrospective study included 189 eyes from 189 adults. Two observers (A and B)
measured the SFCT from 1 : 1 micron and 1 : 1 pixel images for evaluation of
interobserver repeatability. Observer A performed a single additional measurement
for intraobserver repeatability.ResultsThe mean age was 45.1±11.1 years. The mean
SFCT from 1 : 1 pixel and 1 : 1 micron images were 315.3±89.2 and 312.6±88.4 μm, 
respectively. The subjects were divided into three subgroups based on the mean CT
from 1 : 1 pixel images: 26 eyes belonged to thin CT group, 111 eyes to
intermediate CT group, and 52 eyes to thick CT group. Interclass coefficients
(ICCs) exhibited high intraobserver repeatability. Interobserver ICCs were also
high, except for thick CT group with 1 : 1 pixel image (ICC≤0.75). Intraobserver 
correlation coefficients were high regardless of CT. Interobserver correlation
coefficients for 1 : 1 pixel images were 0.896 in thin CT group, 0.680 in
intermediate CT group, and 0.624 in thick CT group, respectively (P<0.0001). The 
interobserver ICCs and correlation coefficients from 1 : 1 micron images were
slightly higher than from 1 : 1 pixel images.ConclusionsThe repeatability for the
two observers was reduced in thick CT group despite high total repeatability.
1 : 1 Micron images provided slightly better repeatability in interobserver
measurements. CT measurements should be interpreted cautiously, particularly for 
a thick choroid.Eye advance online publication, 12 September 2014;
doi:10.1038/eye.2014.197.

PMID: 25214002   [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]


2. Eye (Lond). 2014 Sep 12. doi: 10.1038/eye.2014.206. [Epub ahead of print]

The reporting quality of parallel randomised controlled trials in ophthalmic
surgery in 2011: a systematic review.

Yao AC(1), Khajuria A(1), Camm CF(2), Edison E(3), Agha R(4).

Author information: 
(1)School of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK.
(2)New College, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
(3)University College London, London, UK.
(4)Stoke Mandeville Hospital, Buckinghamshire, UK.

PurposeRandomised controlled trials (RCTs) represent a gold standard for
evaluating therapeutic interventions. However, poor reporting clarity can prevent
readers from assessing potential bias that can arise from a lack of
methodological rigour. The Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials statement
for non-pharmacological interventions 2008 (CONSORT NPT) was developed to aid
reporting. RCTs in ophthalmic surgery pose particular challenges in study design 
and implementation. We aim to provide the first assessment of the compliance of
RCTs in ophthalmic surgery to the CONSORT NPT statement.MethodIn August 2012, the
Medline database was searched for RCTs in ophthalmic surgery reported between 1
January 2011 and 31 December 2011. Results were searched by two authors and
relevant papers selected. Papers were scored against the 23-item CONSORT NPT
checklist and compared against surrogate markers of paper quality. The CONSORT
score was also compared between different RCT designs.ResultsIn all, 186 papers
were retrieved. Sixty-five RCTs, involving 5803 patients, met the inclusion
criteria. The mean CONSORT score was 8.9 out of 23 (39%, range 3.0-14.7, SD
2.49). The least reported items related to the title and abstract (1.6%),
reporting intervention adherence (3.1%), and interpretation of results (4.7%). No
significant correlation was found between CONSORT score and journal impact factor
(R=0.14, P=0.29), number of authors (R=0.01, P=0.93), or whether the RCT used
paired-eye, one-eye, or two-eye designs in their randomisation
(P=0.97).ConclusionsThe reporting of RCTs in ophthalmic surgery is suboptimal.
Further work is needed by trial groups, funding agencies, authors, and journals
to improve reporting clarity.Eye advance online publication, 12 September 2014;
doi:10.1038/eye.2014.206.

PMID: 25214001   [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]


3. Eye (Lond). 2014 Sep 12. doi: 10.1038/eye.2014.212. [Epub ahead of print]

A subtle case of hydroxychloroquine retinopathy: spectral domain optical
coherence tomography findings.

Barnes AC(1), Bhavsar K(2), Weber ML(2), Witkin AJ(2).

Author information: 
(1)Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA.
(2)New England Eye Center at Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA.

PMID: 25214000   [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]


4. Eye (Lond). 2014 Sep 12. doi: 10.1038/eye.2014.215. [Epub ahead of print]

Comment on 'Photocoagulation guided by wide-field fundus autofluorescence in eyes
with asteroid hyalosis': single and double pass of light in the ocular media.

Davies N.

Author information: 
Department of Ophthalmology, Chelsea and Westminster Healthcare NHS Foundation
Trust, London, UK.

PMID: 25213999   [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]


5. Eye (Lond). 2014 Sep;28(9):1150. doi: 10.1038/eye.2014.194.

Redesigning services for the management of vitreomacular traction and macular
hole.

Amoaku W, Cackett P, Tyagi A, Mahmood U, Nosek J, Mennie G, Rumney N.

PMID: 25208690   [PubMed - in process]


6. Eye (Lond). 2014 Sep 5. doi: 10.1038/eye.2014.202. [Epub ahead of print]

A case of Hunter syndrome with bilateral retinal detachment.

Ivanova T, Jalil A, Vallejo-Garcia JL, Patton N.

Author information: 
Manchester Royal Eye Hospital, Oxford Road, Manchester, UK.

PMID: 25190538   [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]


7. Eye (Lond). 2014 Sep 5. doi: 10.1038/eye.2014.211. [Epub ahead of print]

Effects of head elevation on intraocular pressure in healthy subjects: raising
bed head vs using multiple pillows.

Yeon DY(1), Yoo C(1), Lee TE(2), Park JH(1), Kim YY(1).

Author information: 
(1)Department of Ophthalmology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
(2)Department of Ophthalmology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University
College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

PurposeTo evaluate the effects of different methods of head elevation on
intraocular pressure (IOP) in healthy young subjects.MethodsTwenty-four healthy
young Korean subjects were included in this prospective observational study. The 
IOP measurements were taken with the subjects in the sitting position and in the 
supine positions with the head flat and 30° up using two different methods: (1)
raising the bed head and (2) using multiple pillows. IOP was measured using
Tonopen AVIA in both eyes 10 min after assuming each position in a randomized
sequence. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare the IOP by changing
the methods of head elevation.ResultsMean IOP of both eyes when sitting was lower
than that measured in the supine position with head flat (P=0.001). Compared with
that measured in the supine position with head flat, the mean IOP was lower when 
measured in the supine position with the head kept 30 ° up by bed head elevation 
(P=0.001), whereas the mean IOP was not significantly different when measured in 
the supine position with the head elevated using multiple pillows (right eye,
P=0.061; left eye, P=0.089).ConclusionIn normal subjects, IOP was lower when
measured in the supine position with the head kept up by the bed head elevation
compared with that measured when lying flat. However, such head-up
position-induced IOP reduction was not found when the head was kept up using
multiple pillows. These findings suggest that elevating the head using multiple
pillows may not help to reduce IOP in the supine posture.Eye advance online
publication, 5 September 2014; doi:10.1038/eye.2014.211.

PMID: 25190537   [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]


8. Eye (Lond). 2014 Sep 5. doi: 10.1038/eye.2014.201. [Epub ahead of print]

Chronic Staphylococcus hominis endophthalmitis following injury with a retained
intraocular foreign body.

Sychev YV, Vemulakonda GA.

Author information: 
Department of Ophthalmology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.

PMID: 25190536   [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]


9. Eye (Lond). 2014 Sep 5. doi: 10.1038/eye.2014.203. [Epub ahead of print]

Spontaneous improvement in myopic foveoschisis.

Paulus YM, Bressler NM.

Author information: 
Retina Division, Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD,
USA.

PMID: 25190535   [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]


10. Eye (Lond). 2014 Sep 5. doi: 10.1038/eye.2014.208. [Epub ahead of print]

Accommodation-induced intraocular pressure changes in progressing myopes and
emmetropes.

Yan L, Huibin L, Xuemin L.

Author information: 
Department of Ophthalmology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, China.

PurposeTo investigate the changes of intraocular pressure (IOP) and anterior eye 
segment biometric parameters under different accommodative statuses in
progressing myopes and emmetropes.MethodsForty-six progressing myopes and 40
emmetropes participated in this study. All the subjects had their IOP and
anterior eye segment biometric parameters (including corneal thickness, anterior 
chamber depth, anterior chamber angle width, and lens thickness) measured using
iCare rebound tonometer and VisanteTM anterior segment-optical coherence
tomography while accommodative stimuli of 0, 3, and 6D were
presented.ResultsThere was no significant difference in IOP between progressing
myopes and emmetropes when no accommodation was induced (16.22±4.11 vs
17.01±3.72, respectively, t=-0.93, P>0.05). However, IOP significantly increased 
with accommodation in progressing myopes (mean change +1.02±2.07 mm Hg from 0D to
6D, F=5.35, P<0.01), but remained unchanged (mean change -0.76±3.22 mm Hg from 0D
to 6D, F=1.46, P>0.05) in emmetropes. Meanwhile, we found that their anterior
chamber depth decreased (P<0.01), anterior chamber angle narrowed (P<0.01), and
lens thickened (P<0.01) significantly with accommodation, both in progressing
myopes and emmetropes.ConclusionsAlthough no difference was detected between the 
IOPs of progressing myopes and emmetropes without accommodation, accommodation
could induce transient IOP elevation in progressing myopes. Simultaneously, we
found that their anterior chamber depth decreased, anterior chamber angle
narrowed, and lens thickened with accommodation. Although emmetropes showed the
similar anterior eye segment structure changes, their IOPs did not increase with 
accommodation. Our study indicated that IOP elevation with accommodation in
progressing myopes might be related to myopia progression.Eye advance online
publication, 5 September 2014; doi:10.1038/eye.2014.208.

PMID: 25190534   [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]


11. Eye (Lond). 2014 Sep 5. doi: 10.1038/eye.2014.209. [Epub ahead of print]

Impact of laser refractive surgery on ocular alignment in myopic patients.

Chung SA(1), Kim WK(2), Moon JW(3), Yang H(1), Kim JK(2), Lee SB(4), Lee JB(3).

Author information: 
(1)Department of Ophthalmology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Korea.
(2)B&VIIT Eye Clinic, Seoul, Korea.
(3)The Institute of Vision Research, Department of Ophthalmology, Yonsei University 
College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
(4)Department of Ophthalmology, Chungnam National University College of Medicine,
Daejeon, Korea.

PurposeTo evaluate the impact of myopic keratorefractive surgery on ocular
alignment.MethodsThis prospective study included 194 eyes of 97 myopic patients
undergoing laser refractive surgery. All patients received a complete ophthalmic 
examination with particular attention to ocular alignment before and 3 months
after surgery.ResultsPatients with a mean age of 26.6 years and a mean refractive
error of -4.83 diopters (D) myopia were treated. Asymptomatic ocular misalignment
was present preoperatively in 46 (47%) patients: a small-angle heterophoria
(1-8 prism diopters, PD) in 36%; and a large-angle heterophoria
(>8 PD)/heterotropia in 11%. Postoperatively, the change in angles of 10 PD or
greater occurred in 3% for distance and 6% for near fixation: in 7% of the
patients with orthophoria, in 3% of those with a small-angle heterophoria, and in
18% of those with a large-angle heterophoria/heterotropia. No patient developed
diplopia. The preoperative magnitude of myopia or postoperative refractive status
was not related to the change in ocular alignment. The higher anisometropia was
associated with a decrease in deviation (P=0.041 for distance and P=0.002 for
near fixation), whereas the further near point of convergence tended to be
related with an increase in near deviation (P=0.055).ConclusionsMyopic refractive
surgery may cause a change in ocular alignment, especially in cases with a
large-angle heterophoria/heterotropia. There is also a chance of improvement of
misalignment in patients with anisometropia.Eye advance online publication, 5
September 2014; doi:10.1038/eye.2014.209.

PMID: 25190533   [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]


12. Eye (Lond). 2014 Sep 5. doi: 10.1038/eye.2014.210. [Epub ahead of print]

The role of orbital ultrasonography in distinguishing papilledema from
pseudopapilledema.

Carter SB(1), Pistilli M(2), Livingston KG(3), Gold DR(3), Volpe NJ(4), Shindler 
KS(3), Liu GT(5), Tamhankar MA(3).

Author information: 
(1)Department of Ophthalmology, New York University School of Medicine, New York,
NY, USA.
(2)Center for Preventive Ophthalmology and Biostatistics, University of
Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
(3)Division of Neuro-Ophthalmology, Scheie Eye Institute, University of
Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
(4)Department of Ophthalmology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern
University, Chicago, IL, USA.
(5)Division of Neuro-Ophthalmology, Hospital of University of Pennsylvania,
Philadelphia, PA, USA.

PurposeTo determine the sensitivity and specificity of orbital ultrasonography in
distinguishing papilledema from pseudopapilledema in adult patients.MethodsThe
records of all adult patients referred to the neuro-ophthalmology service who
underwent orbital ultrasonography for the evaluation of suspected papilledema
were reviewed. The details of history, ophthalmologic examination, and results of
ancillary testing including orbital ultrasonography, MRI, and lumbar puncture
were recorded. Results of orbital ultrasonography were correlated with the final 
diagnosis of papilledema or pseudopapilledema on the basis of the clinical
impression of the neuro-ophthalmologist. Ultrasound was considered positive when 
the optic nerve sheath diameter was ≥3.3 mm along with a positive 30°
test.ResultsThe sensitivity of orbital ultrasonography for detection of
papilledema was 90% (CI: 80.2-99.3%) and the specificity in detecting
pseudopapilledema was 79% (CI: 67.7-90.7%).ConclusionsOrbital ultrasonography is 
a rapid and noninvasive test that is highly sensitive, but less specific in
differentiating papilledema from pseudopapilledema in adult patients, and can be 
useful in guiding further management of patients in whom the diagnosis is
initially uncertain.Eye advance online publication, 5 September 2014;
doi:10.1038/eye.2014.210.

PMID: 25190532   [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]


13. Eye (Lond). 2014 Sep 5. doi: 10.1038/eye.2014.204. [Epub ahead of print]

Comment on 'Herpes zoster ophthalmicus reduction: implementation of shingles
vaccination in the UK'

Clearkin L.

Author information: 
Eye Department, Arrowe Park Hospital, Wirral University Teaching Hospital NHST,
Wirral, UK.

PMID: 25190531   [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]


14. Eye (Lond). 2014 Sep 5. doi: 10.1038/eye.2014.205. [Epub ahead of print]

Response to Dr Clearkin.

Williams G(1), Olson JA(2).

Author information: 
(1)Tennant Institute of Ophthalmology, Gartnavel General Hospital, Glasgow, UK.
(2)The Eye Clinic, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen, UK.

PMID: 25190530   [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]


15. Eye (Lond). 2014 Aug 29. doi: 10.1038/eye.2014.196. [Epub ahead of print]

A novel deletion mutation in RS1 gene caused X-linked juvenile retinoschisis in a
Chinese family.

Huang Y, Mei L, Gui B, Su W, Liang D, Wu L, Pan Q.

Author information: 
State Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, Xiangya Hospital, Central South
University, Changsha, China.

PurposeX-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS), a leading cause of juvenile
macular degeneration, is characterized by a spoke-wheel pattern in the macular
region of the retina and splitting of the neurosensory retina. This study aimed
to identify the underlying genetic defect in a Chinese family with
XLRS.MethodsThe proband underwent complete ophthalmic examinations, including
fundus examination, fundus autofluorescence, and optical coherence tomography.
DNA extracted from proband and his younger brother was screened for mutations in 
RS1 gene. The detected RS1 mutation was tested in all available family members
and 200 healthy controls.ResultsReduced visual acuity, spoke-wheel pattern at the
fovea, and split retina were observed in the proband. A novel frameshift mutation
c.206-207delTG in the RS1 gene, leading to a truncated protein (p.L69fs16X), was 
identified in the proband and his younger brother. This mutation was not found in
any unaffected member or in the healthy controls. The mother of the proband was
hemizygous for this mutant allele.ConclusionsWe identified a novel causative
mutation of RS1 in a Chinese family with XLRS. This finding expands the mutation 
spectrum of RS1 and provides evidence for a phenotype-genotype study in XLRS.Eye 
advance online publication, 29 August 2014; doi:10.1038/eye.2014.196.

PMID: 25168411   [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]


16. Eye (Lond). 2014 Aug 22. doi: 10.1038/eye.2014.186. [Epub ahead of print]

Association of retinal vessel calibre and visual outcome in eyes with diabetic
macular oedema treated with ranibizumab.

Moradi A(1), Sepah YJ(2), Ibrahim MA(2), Sophie R(1), Moazez C(1), Bittencourt
MG(1), Annam RE(1), Hanout M(2), Liu H(1), Ferraz D(2), Do DV(3), Nguyen QD(3).

Author information: 
(1)Retinal Imaging Research and Reading Centre, Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins 
University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.
(2)1] Retinal Imaging Research and Reading Centre, Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns
Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA [2] Ocular Imaging
Research and Reading Centre, Stanley M. Truhlsen Eye Institute, University of
Nebraska Medical Centre, Omaha, NE, USA.
(3)Ocular Imaging Research and Reading Centre, Stanley M. Truhlsen Eye Institute,
University of Nebraska Medical Centre, Omaha, NE, USA.

PurposeThe study aims to identify the association between the baseline retinal
vascular calibre and visual outcome of patients with diabetic macular oedema
(DMO) treated with intravitreal ranibizumab.MethodsThe 1-M field (as defined in
the ETDRS study) of the digital colour fundus photographs of DMO patients who had
been treated primarily with ranibizumab in a clinical trial was assessed. Of the 
84 patients, 25 had gradable retinal photographs that could be subjected to
analyses by the Interactive Vessel Analysis (IVAN) software at baseline. The
average retinal vascular calibre of the six largest venules (CRVE) and the six
largest arterioles (CRAE) in the peripapillary area (0.5 and 1 disc diameter from
the optic disc margin) was measured. The relationship between CRVE and CRAE at
baseline and the change in visual acuity at month 12 was assessed using the
Mann-Whitney U test.ResultsTen eyes from 10 patients who had shown an improvement
of ≥2 lines of best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) at month 12 had a wider
baseline CRVE (248.3±24.5 μm) compared with the 15 eyes from 15 patients who did 
not show the improvement of ≥2 lines (226.6±44.8 μm, P<0.05). The baseline CRAE
did not differ significantly in these patients (156.1±22.7 vs 142±17.5 μm,
P=0.17).ConclusionsA wider baseline retinal venular calibre may be a predictor of
better visual outcome in DMO eyes treated with ranibizumab. Further prospective
studies with a larger sample size and a broader range of disease severity and
visual acuity are needed to confirm this finding.Eye advance online publication, 
22 August 2014; doi:10.1038/eye.2014.186.

PMID: 25145456   [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]